Awful Dudes Sticky Notes Hybrid Work

September 29, 2009

Hello, all.  I am part of Team Awful Dudes.  For our sticky notes, we organized them into two cagetories:

1)  Method of Mass Communication

video games, radio, seminar, sides of buses, posters, banner ads, internet, shirts, graffiti, books, opera, snail mail, speech/public speaking, color, music, email, photography, twitter, semaphore, print, Morse code, Instant Messaging, writing, theatre/plays, smoke signals, TV/boob tube, propaganda, Facebook/MySpace, language, marketing/advertising, code lights, slide shows, hand gestures, traffic signs, online conference, telegraph, cave paintings, cuneiform, sky writing, electromagnetic broadcast, hieroglyphics, Pony Express, horns/whistles, facial expressions, drums,

2)  Tool of Mass Communication/Device

bluetooth, head on a stick, Jack-In-the-Box commercials, freshmaker commercials (mentos), iPhone apps, Jumbo-tron, spotlights, blimps, satellites, walkie-talkie, MP3 players, computers, PowerPoint, webcam, Samurai fans, flares, blow horns, cell phones, Viewmaster, landline phones, sandwich board, Town Criers, camera, flags, projectors, wedding band

And now, for something completely different.  Here are my FIVE (three, sir!) THREE examples.  I mean, five.  It’s actually five.

  1. Head On a Stick.  This is an ancient method of communicating en mass with your opponent’s army, and quite a message that is.  It is a non-verbal way of saying, “Mess with us and you’ll end up like this guy.”  Ouchies, not to mention gruesome.  http://pics.uglychristmaslights.com/2004/pike.jpg
  2. Samurai fans.  In ancient Japan, certain samurai were trained in the art of fan signals – an effective, silent method of communicating the plan to your fellow samurai.  Kind of like using flags in battle, but more awesomer.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_war_fan
  3. Drums.  Used by many cultures, such as the samurai (again) or even them cannibal types, drums can signal many things, such as “We’re marching to battle,” “We’re coming after you to eat you,” or “Man this bonfire is kickin’.”  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drum_%28communication%29
  4. Cuneiform.  Developed by the ancient Sumerians, cuneiform was one of the first writing methods.  In it, Sumerian symbols were chiseled directly onto large stone tablets, many of which have been found by modern archaeologists and used to study their ancient culture.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuneiformhttp://ant3145-mesopotamia.wikispaces.com/file/view/cuneiform.jpg
  5. Propaganda.  One of my least favorite methods of mass communication, propaganda is used heavily by governments to promote their opiates for the masses and control people, stirring them up to blindly follow the patriotic banner.  Bleargh.  Not for me.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propaganda
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2 Responses to “Awful Dudes Sticky Notes Hybrid Work”

  1. yoursurprise-bellatio-4 said

    Hmm it looks like your website ate my first comment (it was super long) so I guess I’ll just sum it up what I had written and say, I’m thoroughly enjoying your blog. I too am an aspiring blog writer but I’m still new to the whole thing. Do you have any tips and hints for beginner blog writers? I’d genuinely appreciate it.

    • Hi! Glad you’re enjoying my blog. 🙂 It began as a student blog for college, so I haven’t updated it in a while, but I was actually just thinking about getting back to updating it more regularly.

      My posts here covered a variety of subjects but mostly related to design, technology, and music; those are my main interests about which I could blog all day. I would recommend blogging about your passions, things that drive you. Find a unique voice and spin, as that will set you apart from the vast sea of other similar blogs that may be floating around out there. Also, most importantly, update often – even if it is only a short post. That will keep regular readers interested so they come back.

      Hope that helped, and have fun blogging! Thanks for stopping by.

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